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Browse Prior Art Database

Automatic Video Surveillance Technique

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112901D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cramer, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

Described is a method for automatically recognizing changes of an object to be surveyed by using a video camera and variable bitrate coding hardware.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 67% of the total text.

Automatic Video Surveillance Technique

      Described is a method for automatically recognizing changes of
an object to be surveyed by using a video camera and variable bitrate
coding hardware.

      Video cameras are often used for the surveillance of objects by
security personel.  Using a number of video cameras makes it possible
that one person surveys several objects.  However, it is not possible
that one person surveys the displays of all video cameras at the same
time.  Therefore, a concept is required which recognizes changes of
the surveyed objects automatically and which then alerts the security
person.

      By using special hardware and software, it is possible to
digitize and compress video- and audio data streams in real time.
Such adapter cards are marketed e.g. by IBM under the name of IBM
ActionMedia II.

      One possible method for the compression of the data streams is
the variable bit rate encoding which is described in the IBM ENC
Technical Report No.  43.9212.  This method does not compress the
data streams to packets of equal lengths.  Instead, the lengths of
the packets depend on the object.  A change of the object results in
a change of the lengths of the packets as well.

      If, for example, the entrance of a parking lot is surveyed,
then the lengths of the packets remain almost constant, as long as
there is no car driving in or out.  However, when the scenery
changes, for example when a car drives in or out of th...