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Computer Assisted Speech Therapy with Phoneme Chaining

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112925D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boyer, L: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a computer program for assisting a therapist in training a client to pronounce a series of sustained phonemes. The program is run as part of a system using speech analysis for speech therapy, providing visual feedback on a display screen as an input is provided by the client through the use of a microphone. The client can use this visual feedback as an aid in correcting his pronunciation.

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Computer Assisted Speech Therapy with Phoneme Chaining

      Disclosed is a computer program for assisting a therapist in
training a client to pronounce a series of sustained phonemes.  The
program is run as part of a system using speech analysis for speech
therapy, providing visual feedback on a display screen as an input is
provided by the client through the use of a microphone.  The client
can use this visual feedback as an aid in correcting his
pronunciation.

      The computer program is used for chaining up to four phoneme
accuracy exercises, each of which focuses on the pronunciation of a
specific phoneme chosen by the therapist.  Once the target
pronunciation of a phoneme is matched by the client, the program
automatically advances to the next phoneme.  For example, if the
therapist selects the sequence of phonemes /m/, /a/, /m/, /a/, the
client first pronounces a sustained /m/ sound.  When sufficient
accuracy is attained in this sound, the client is shown that the next
target is /a/.  Then an /m/ is supplied as a target again, to be
followed by another /a/.  When the end of the sequence is reached,
positive reinforcement is given to the client, and the game is
subsequently reset to the beginning.  With practice, the client
increases his speed of pronunciation, until the phonemes are blended
into a word, such as, in this example, "mama."

      During the operation of the program, a game screen is presented
on the display unit, with four diagona...