Browse Prior Art Database

Remote Logical Volume

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112964D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Devarakonda, M: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a mechanism in AIX*/6000 to access disk storage on a remote system at the disk block level for reading and writing. It is called Remote Logical Volume (RLV). This mechanism can be employed in a cluster of RISC System/6000*'s to support a cluster file system that provides user level shared access to the file data stored on disks. The RLV interface is a pseudo block device in AIX and accepts read and write requests in the form of AIX "buf structs". The mechanism consists of a client-stub on the requesting cluster node and a server-stub on the remote system that has the disks. Multiple client nodes are allowed for a single server node. In the server node a set of kprocs carry out actual reads and writes.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 61% of the total text.

Remote Logical Volume

      Disclosed is a mechanism in AIX*/6000 to access disk storage on
a remote system at the disk block level for reading and writing.  It
is called Remote Logical Volume (RLV).  This mechanism can be
employed in a cluster of RISC System/6000*'s to support a cluster
file system that provides user level shared access to the file data
stored on disks.  The RLV interface is a pseudo block device in AIX
and accepts read and write requests in the form of AIX "buf structs".
The mechanism consists of a client-stub on the requesting cluster
node and a server-stub on the remote system that has the disks.
Multiple client nodes are allowed for a single server node.  In the
server node a set of kprocs carry out actual reads and writes.

      In the initialization phase, RLV allows a user to create a
pseudo block device on the client node, and to specify the server
node and a logical volume on the server node corresponding to the
pseudo-device.  RLV implements a read request by sending the
description of the required block to the server node; An RLV kproc on
the server node constructs a buf struct, queues it to the logical
volume interface and returns results upon I/O completion; The RLV
code on the client then signals request completion to its caller.
RLV implements the write request in a similar way:  The client node
sends data along with the block description, and the server node
carries out writing of the data to the appropriate logical volume.

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