Browse Prior Art Database

Duplex Particulate Filter for Disk Drives

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000112974D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Tzeng, HM: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a new configuration of filter construction that takes advantage of the unique particle/flow characteristics in the disk drive to improve the effectiveness of particle removal. In the disk drive, a particulate filter is usually placed at a corner location in proximity to the disk stack. The particle-laden airflow enters the space formed by the filter medium and the shroud of the disk drive. Particles are captured mainly by the side of the filter medium that faces the incoming flow, i.e., the front face. Based on the experience with other uniform-flow filtrations, one expects the back side, i.e., the side facing the disk stack, will not be effective in removing particles.

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Duplex Particulate Filter for Disk Drives

      Disclosed is a new configuration of filter construction that
takes advantage of the unique particle/flow characteristics in the
disk drive to improve the effectiveness of particle removal.  In the
disk drive, a particulate filter is usually placed at a corner
location in proximity to the disk stack.  The particle-laden airflow
enters the space formed by the filter medium and the shroud of the
disk drive.  Particles are captured mainly by the side of the filter
medium that faces the incoming flow, i.e., the front face.  Based on
the experience with other uniform-flow filtrations, one expects the
back side, i.e., the side facing the disk stack, will not be
effective in removing particles.

      Particles are captured by the filter medium by a combination of
the following mechanisms:  inertial impaction, interception, particle
straining, electrostatic effects, and Brownian motions.  The
closeness of the corner filter to the rapidly spinning disk stack may
cause the inertial impaction and interception mechanisms to
contribute significantly to the total particle removal.

      Secondary flows are known to promote particle deposition from
the airflow on the adjacent wall through inertial impaction and
interception.  The disclosed scheme, shown in the figure, calls for
the generation of a train of wavy elements on the back side (facing
the disk stack) of the filter medium.  Longitudinal axes of these
wavy elemen...