Browse Prior Art Database

Measurement of Inventories using ID Tags with Embedded Random Number Generator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113096D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dreyfus, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Radio frequency scanned systems find and identify items by giving a specific electronic (digital) identification code. One might visualize this as an electronic equivalent to the common bar code. When using such transponders to identify items at a given location ( bin, shelf, drawer, etc.) all of the ID tags respond with a similarly encoded signal for a specific type of inventoried unit. In which case it is not possible to determine the quantity of the particular item; one only knows that one or more are present.

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Measurement of Inventories using ID Tags with Embedded Random Number
Generator

      Radio frequency scanned systems find and identify items by
giving a specific electronic (digital) identification code.  One
might visualize this as an electronic equivalent to the common bar
code.  When using such transponders to identify items at a given
location ( bin, shelf, drawer, etc.)  all of the ID tags respond with
a similarly encoded signal for a specific type of inventoried unit.
In which case it is not possible to determine the quantity of the
particular item; one only knows that one or more are present.

      The present proposal consists of a way to do inventory
measurements of any desired statistical accuracy.  The technique is
to use an active portion of the circuit as part of the echo following
a query pulse directed to a specifically addressed transponder.  The
primary point is to have the echo have several digits, say four for
purposes of illustration, added to the end of the identification
code.  In a simple case a random number generator would be part of
the circuit and would encode the 4 bits as either 0 or 1.  The random
number generator would be set so that it only could generate a 1 on
the next digit if there were only 1's in all the positions to the
left of this one.  In one extreme case if there were only one unit in
the box then you would sense a one (1) 1/2 the time.  Also you might
sense a sub-set, 1,1, then 1/4 of the time, etc.  In the next...