Browse Prior Art Database

Cadat Source to Lasar Source Simulation Translator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113168D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Finkel, P: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A program is disclosed that converts CADAT* simulation stimulus files into LASAR** simulation stimulus files. The program reuses CADAT simulation code to generate syntactically correct LASAR code. The program replaces manual techniques for translating simulation code.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Cadat Source to Lasar Source Simulation Translator

      A program is disclosed that converts CADAT* simulation stimulus
files into LASAR** simulation stimulus files.  The  program reuses
CADAT simulation code to generate syntactically correct LASAR code.
The program replaces manual techniques for translating simulation
code.

      The main purpose of the program is a language translator.  It
translates CADAT stimulus language to LASAR stimulus language.  The
resulting LASAR code is high speed (or dynamic) stimulus.  The
program also extracts information from the CADAT code which defines
relative signal timing, TSET, and associates primary inputs to a
specific timing relationship, SET DIGITAL.

      A subset of the entire CADAT stimulus command set it translated
by the program.  This subset represents those commands with the most
direct correlation to LASAR stimulus commands.  The table shows the
association between CADAT and LASAR commands.

      The following list contains CADAT commands that are accepted by
the program but have no LASAR equivalent.

o   CIRCUIT

o   TIMEDEF

o   CHECKPOINT

o   ALIGN

      The program takes advantage of a number of similarities between
the CADAT and LASAR language structures.  Of particular interest, is
the availability of loops and subroutines.  These two devices are
used to keep stimulus code to a reasonable length by economizing the
generation of repeated code.

      A loop simulates the repetition of a number of instructions
without having to explicitly list each instruction.  Advancing time
in a simulation program is an example of a loop.  Several cycles of a
clock can be executed by simply looping through the same instruction.
Without the looping capability, each clock cycle is listed
explicitly.  The program successfully translates CADAT loops into
proper LASAR code.

      A subroutine repeatedly adds a series of instructions into the
simulation stimulus.  The circuit's acknowledgement of a processor's
read cycle is an example of the usefulness...