Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Disk Pick-Up/Load Tool and Orientation Tray

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113197D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 54K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DenHartog, BR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A tool combination consisting of a stackable orientation tray and a mating multi-part load tool which loads parts into a lapping/polishing carrier (or spider) is being disclosed. The load tool lifts the number of parts contained by one carrier, maintains the correct orientation as received on the tray, and allows the loading of an entire carrier with one motion. The stackable tray is designed with hubs that locate the parts in the exact same location as the holes in the carrier.

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Multi-Disk Pick-Up/Load Tool and Orientation Tray

      A tool combination consisting of a stackable orientation tray
and a mating multi-part load tool which loads parts into a
lapping/polishing carrier (or spider) is being disclosed.  The load
tool lifts the number of parts contained by one carrier, maintains
the correct orientation as received on the tray, and allows the
loading of an entire carrier with one motion.  The stackable tray is
designed with hubs that locate the parts in the exact same location
as the holes in the carrier.

      As shown in Fig. 1, the load tool consists of an array of
vacuum cups that are activated by pulling a trigger.  The locations
of the vacuum cups are critical, and are determined by the carrier
that the parts are to be loaded into.  At the center hub of the tool
on the bottom side is a tapered triangular alignment pin that mates
with a raised triangular hole that is placed in the center of the
orientation tray.  As shown in Fig. 2, the tray also has hubs that
locate the parts in the exact same location as the holes in the
carrier.  The hubs are given an additional ledge near the bottom so
that the surface of the part will not contact the tray except at the
extreme ID.  This tray was made stackable, even when loaded with
parts, so that large quantities of parts could be preloaded onto the
trays and carted to the machines on lowerators that keep the top of
the stack at the optimum work height.  The cost of the trays was
mi...