Browse Prior Art Database

Architecture for Container Display Expansion

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113227D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 435K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Banning, KR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a general structure for a standard user interface architecture for displaying an arbitrary number of objects of different classes within a container object.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Architecture for Container Display Expansion

      Disclosed is a general structure for a standard user interface
architecture for displaying an arbitrary number of objects of
different classes within a container object.

      In a graphical user interface, it is often necessary to contain
objects within other objects.  These objects may contain objects of
varying classes.  Additionally, when a large number of objects exist
in the interface, it is necessary to be able to selectively expand
and contract container objects.

      An architecture has been invented to allow an object which
contains other object to be expanded and contracted to selectively
show the contents.  When a container object is expanded,
sub-containers for each class of contained object are displayed to
the right and below of the parent container object.  These scrollable
sub-containers give visual references for each object contained of
the specified class and an indication of the parent and child
relationship between the container and its contents.  Lines
connecting the scrollable sub-container to the parent container may
or may not be displayed in order to reinforce the displayed
relationship.  Each sub-container is totally manipulable according to
its own rules of manipulation (it may be minimized, etc.).

      An example of a container object before expansion and a
container object after expansion showing sub-container may be seen in
Figs. 1 and 2 respectively.