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Browse Prior Art Database

Silicon Cube Burn-In Methodology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113230D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Beilstein, KE: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Semiconductor chips are generally packaged to be mounted adjacent to and/or parallel to the component board, with pads face up in the case of wire bonded devices, or pad face down in the case of flip-chip attachment. Memory cube technology employs chips laminated face-to-back with a pad transfer layer such that I/O pads are accessible on at least one surface of the cube. The cube involves use of insulators, metals and adhesives which are compatible with semiconductor technology such that the cube is a packaged component. It attaches to the next level of assembly as does a packaged (pad format) or unpackaged chip. A method of burning in the cube as a means of eliminating early life failure in the semiconductors, is suggested by this invention.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Silicon Cube Burn-In Methodology

      Semiconductor chips are generally packaged to be mounted
adjacent to and/or parallel to the component board, with pads face up
in the case of wire bonded devices, or pad face down in the case of
flip-chip attachment.  Memory cube technology employs chips laminated
face-to-back with a pad transfer layer such that I/O pads are
accessible on at least one surface of the cube.  The cube involves
use of insulators, metals and adhesives which are compatible with
semiconductor technology such that the cube is a packaged component.
It attaches to the next level of assembly as does a packaged (pad
format) or unpackaged chip.  A method of burning in the cube as a
means of eliminating early life failure in the semiconductors, is
suggested by this invention.  This method does not require use of an
oven for environmental control, and includes spare chips packaged in
the cube to replace failed devices.  The number of spare chips to be
included is calculated based on yield projections.

      To describe the burn-in concept, a cube containing a multitude
of chips is to be attached to a circuit board.  The board has power,
ground and electrical signal lines to be supplied to the cube
component.  The cube is a good heat conductor so the temperature is
relatively evenly distributed.  The temperature can be raised to the
required burn-in temperature using only the power dissipated by the
chips.  Temperature can be monitored, and controlled by any of
several available means, by use of a thermo-couple on the surface, an
optical non-contact measure- ment or incorporation of a silicon
device to measure temperature using the well known I-V-Temperature
algorithm of a diode.  Power is bused to a limited number of chips
based on the relationship between power dissipated and temperature
rise...