Browse Prior Art Database

Phase Compatibilizer for Morphological Composites

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113257D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Feger, C: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The use of a mixture of two materials which, on reaction, result in the same polymer material is described in (*) (For example a mixture of polyamic acid PAA) and polyamic acid ester (PAAE) which both become polyimide on heating as cited). However, the materials must be freshly mixed, because as we describe the material it tends to separate into separate phases, and the sizes of the phase separated material regions increase with time. The properties of the material depend on have the separated phases having the correct size, and this means the material has a short shelf life. Also, the material can not be made with large ratios between the component parts.

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Phase Compatibilizer for Morphological Composites

      The use of a mixture of two materials which, on reaction,
result in the same polymer material is described in (*)  (For example
a mixture of polyamic acid PAA) and polyamic acid ester (PAAE) which
both become polyimide on heating as cited).  However, the materials
must be freshly mixed, because as we describe the material it tends
to separate into separate phases, and the sizes of the phase
separated material regions increase with time.  The properties of the
material depend on have the separated phases having the correct size,
and this means the material has a short shelf life.  Also, the
material can not be made with large ratios between the component
parts.

      Disclosed is a copolymer of the materials which acts as a phase
compatibilizer, so that when the copolymer is added to the mixture of
the two materials, there is not phase separation.  The ratio of the
two materials can be much larger or smaller.  When the materials are
reacted (imidized in the example cited above) the mixture phase
separates, and the resulting material forms the same morphological
composite as we had before.  The shelf life problem is solved, since
the phase separation occurs just before the final imidization, and
the ratio of the two components can be much greater than previously.

Reference

(*)  U.S.  Patent 5,288,842.