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Autostereoscopic 3-D Image Display Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113442D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 66K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Miyazawa, A: AUTHOR

Abstract

Autostereoscopic displays that use a lenticular array (an array of cylindrical lenslets) generate a three-dimensional representation of a scene, which can be viewed by one or more observers without special viewing devices such as spectacles. Such displays operate by presenting different views of the displayed scene when viewed from different angles. Fig. 1 shows the principle of stereopsis used in displays of this type. The lenticular array directs distinct images onto the left and right eyes. The display uses binocular disparity, which is the difference between the images that are projected onto the left and right eyes when they are viewing a 3D scene, to produce a sensation of depth.

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Autostereoscopic 3-D Image Display Device

      Autostereoscopic displays that use a lenticular array (an array
of cylindrical lenslets) generate a three-dimensional representation
of a scene, which can be viewed by one or more observers without
special viewing devices such as spectacles.  Such displays operate by
presenting different views of the displayed scene when viewed from
different angles.  Fig. 1 shows the principle of stereopsis used in
displays of this type.  The lenticular array directs distinct images
onto the left and right eyes.  The display uses binocular disparity,
which is the difference between the images that are projected onto
the left and right eyes when they are viewing a 3D scene, to produce
a sensation of depth.

      By moving horizontally, the viewer can see continuously
changing views of the scene, because several different stereo pairs
are recorded in strips and registered correctly behind the lenticular
array.  The number of views is determined by how many pixels of the
display can be placed within the pitch of the lenslet.  In general,
the more views there are, the stronger the sense of depth.  However,
in the above method it is necessary to increase the resolution of the
display in order to increase the number of views.  Obviously, there
are limitations on the extent to which the display resolution can be
increased.

      Fig. 2 shows the configuration of an autostereoscopic display
embodying a new idea.  We may notice...