Browse Prior Art Database

Spring Winding Device Allows to Instantly Make Extension or Compression Springs

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113535D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barenboim, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a device capable of forming springs from steel wire for use in a model shop. Having to rely on external sources, either for standard size springs or springs made to specification, as is currently done, has disadvantages. For one thing, the need is usually immediate, so the lead time required by purchasing and delivery cycles frequently results in delays to the work for which the springs are needed. What's more, the minimum quantities that must be ordered are frequently greater than the number actually needed.

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Spring Winding Device Allows to Instantly Make Extension or Compression
Springs

      Disclosed is a device capable of forming springs from steel
wire for use in a model shop.  Having to rely on external sources,
either for standard size springs or springs made to specification, as
is currently done, has disadvantages.  For one thing, the need is
usually immediate, so the lead time required by purchasing and
delivery cycles frequently results in delays to the work for which
the springs are needed.  What's more, the minimum quantities that
must be ordered are frequently greater than the number actually
needed.

      The Spring Winding Device (SWD) disclosed herein meets this
need by permitting immediate, reliable fabrication of springs of any
diameter and pitch and in any quantity required.

      Fig. 1 shows isometric top and side views of the SWD 1.  On the
top side of the base 2 is a series of V-shaped, 90º  grooves 3
of different depths to accommodate mandrels (Fig.  2) of different
sizes.  The base has scribed gradation marks 4 for selecting the
pitch of the spring to be wound.  A spring-loaded top plate 5 is
shown in home position, with its scribed center mark 6 aligned with
the center gradation mark 4 on the base.  The top plate is supported
by a spring 8 and pivots around a locking shoulder screw 7.  An
adjustment screw 9 locks the plate and mandrel to the base and keeps
the top plate parallel to the base, making it possible to wind
springs of uniform diameter.  The adjustment screw 9 moves within an
arc-shaped groove 10, which is closed on both sides to limit the
travel of the top plate.

      Fig. 2 shows two types of winding mandrels 11 and 12.  Larger
mandrels 12 have a slot 13 for inserting the wire prior to winding
the spring and removing the spring after it is wound.  Smaller
mandrels 11 whose shaft is too small to accommodate a sl...