Browse Prior Art Database

Saving Window Position in a Manner to Fit User Perceptions and Expectations

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113601D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Morgan, SA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When the user of an application in an OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) environment closes a window, he or she expects that window to appear in the same place, and at the same size, when it is next opened. An application achieves this by saving the window's size and position at the time of closing, and using this saved data to restore the window to its previous place on the screen when it is next displayed.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Saving Window Position in a Manner to Fit User Perceptions and Expectations

      When the user of an application in an OS/2* Presentation
Manager* (PM) environment closes a window, he or she expects that
window to appear in the same place, and at the same size, when it is
next opened.  An application achieves this by saving the window's
size and position at the time of closing, and using this saved data
to restore the window to its previous place on the screen when it is
next displayed.

      A positioning problem is presented when the window's physical
size changes between invocations.  The size may change because the
application font was changed by the user while the window was closed,
for example, and the window had to be resized by the application to
accommodate the new control sizes based on the new font.  Other
application events may also have occurred that caused the application
to change the window size.

      In a PM application, position is relative to the lower-left
corner of the window.  When a window's position is queried, the
position of the lower-left corner is returned.  When a window's
position is set, the lower-left corner is placed at the indicated
coordinates.  If the window's size has changed and the saved
lower-left coordinate is used to position the window when next
displayed, the window will seem to have moved on the desktop.  This
disclosure presents a solution to this movement problem as perceived
by the user.

      Though the operating system positions windows based on the
lower-left corner, the user does not see them this way.  The user is
more accustomed to considering the position of an object to be based
on its upper-left corner.  When a window changes size but its
lower-left corner does not move, the user will still perceive this as
a movement because the perceptual position point of the window, the
upper-left, has in fact moved.

      When position data is saved for a window, therefore, what
should be saved is the upper-left corner's coordinates rather than
the lower-left.  This is the point t...