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Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Network Naming and Routing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113608D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 116K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dunn, JM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is a method, using available network technology, allowing a network to support any combination of users and devices, and allowing a user ID to specify a route to the "mailbox" of the user. A single subscriber to the network can use a number of different subscriber units, and many subscribers can share a single subscriber unit. Furthermore, the system, which can always find the home location of a subscriber, can, in most situations, reach out to a mobile subscriber.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 48% of the total text.

Method for Network Naming and Routing

      Disclosed is a method, using available network technology,
allowing a network to support any combination of users and devices,
and allowing a user ID to specify a route to the "mailbox" of the
user.  A single subscriber to the network can use a number of
different subscriber units, and many subscribers can share a single
subscriber unit.  Furthermore, the system, which can always find the
home location of a subscriber, can, in most situations, reach out to
a mobile subscriber.

      In the current network environment, there are three basic name
and address models.  The first of these models is the voice telephone
model, which, having no name for a target device, has only a route to
the target device built incrementally by selected digits.  Based on a
historical design, these digits actually cause the route to be built.
The second model is the traditional data network model, which
includes logical device names, together with a routing mechanism used
to keep the logical names associated with a physical route.  In many
cases, the logical device names and the routing mechanism are stored
in separately maintained databases, causing confusion and possible
mismatch.  The third model is the type used to identify users
operating explicitly known terminals, such as automatic teller
machines accessed by means of personal identification numbers.

      The disclosed method uses two identifiers--a subscriber
identifier (SID) and a subscriber unit identifier (SUID).  The SID
identifies the end user, which may be a person or function, while the
SUID identifies a network device or other addressable entity.  The
SID and SUID must both be unique.  The SID implies the route to the
subscriber, or at least to a message storage location used by the
subscriber.  The  SID, which is easy to remember, can be used to log
onto the network from a device, such as a telephone, which is not
equipped with a full keyboard.  A single SID can be associated with
one or more SUIDs, and a single SUID can be associated with one or
more SIDs.  A combination of an SID and a Personal Identification
Number (PIN) uniquely describes a single user or function.

      The telephone companies did a substantial number of studies to
determine the characteristics of an easily-remembered identification
code when they introduced calling cards.  They found that a person
could easily remember a 3+3+4+4 digit sequence based on his telephone
number, with the final four digits being a self-checking
authorization code serving as a PIN.

      While this method developed by the telephone companies is not
sufficient for the purposes of the disclosed method, since it does
not uniquely identify both a user and a device, an identification
number incorporating the immediately-familiar telephone number
pattern can be used for these purposes.  For example, the following
number sequence can be used with defaults for the SID number...