Browse Prior Art Database

Machine Processing of Documents in Diverse Formats

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113696D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 60K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Neville, RG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Known Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Magnetic Ink Character Recognition (MICR) machines typically read one or more codelines that are in fixed, predetermined locations or format. For example, telephone company bill and credit card remittance forms have data arranged in this fixed format. In such a system, the OCR and MICR read head may be relatively small and located over only the portion of the document including the fixed format; that is, the width of the read head may be only a small fraction of the height of the document.

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Machine Processing of Documents in Diverse Formats

      Known Optical Character Recognition (OCR) and Magnetic Ink
Character Recognition (MICR) machines typically read one or more
codelines that are in fixed, predetermined locations or format.  For
example, telephone company bill and credit card remittance forms have
data arranged in this fixed format.  In such a system, the OCR and
MICR read head may be relatively small and located over only the
portion of the document including the fixed format; that is, the
width of the read head may be only a small fraction of the height of
the document.

      However, typically, a bank handles various styles of checks,
deposit slips, and related documents, mixed within its normal
document stream.  Data from each check or other document must be read
by machine.  These documents have many different formats where the
fields of interest are located, and it's not practical to standardize
their designs.

      Disclosed is a system for reading these non-standardized
documents.  Information in a known location on the document itself
identifies the location of the fields of interest.  A bank documents
implementation uses part of the MICR codeline to identify the type of
document.  The MICR codeline includes a Transit/Routing number which
is unique for each bank and an Account Number which is unique for
each bank customer.  Internal bank documents may also use these and
additional MICR fields to identify the document type (e.g., cash
slip...