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Browse Prior Art Database

Stackable Personal Computer Memory Card International Association Card

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113701D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 59K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coteus, PW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The Personal Computer Memory Card International Association (PCMCIA) feature card has become a great success in the marketplace. However, the number of PCMCIA style devices that can be used on a computer is limited to the number of card slots or bays available. Once all bays are filled, the user cannot add additional feature cards. We propose a new feature card supporting multiple sub-cards, to overcome this limitation.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 65% of the total text.

Stackable Personal Computer Memory Card International Association Card

      The Personal Computer Memory Card International Association
(PCMCIA) feature card has become a great success in the marketplace.
However, the number of PCMCIA style devices that can be used on a
computer is limited to the number of card slots or bays available.
Once all bays are filled, the user cannot add additional feature
cards.  We propose a new feature card supporting multiple sub-cards,
to overcome this limitation.

      A standard PCMCIA card, model I (3.3mm thick) is shown in the
Figure broken up into 2 sub-units.  A sub-unit has both an input and
an output, to allow stacking.  The connecting means between the cards
(two screws and two hollow pins in the figure) are removable, hence
each sub-unit has a standard shape and can be either the first or
last card in the stack.  A termination card completes the stack.  A
sub-unit may be a simple bus extender which merely passes through
signals, or it may be a feature card.  Extension to multiple cards is
trivial, with 1/3 cards, 1/4 cards, etc being possible.  Present
semiconductor and packaging technology suggests that the simple 1/2
card sub-unit of the Figure should be the most useful.

      The PCMCIA protocol does not explicitly allow multiple cards to
share a common bus, as is required in our design.  However, there are
at least two ways of managing this.  One is to make use of RFU
(reserved for future use) pins to ena...