Browse Prior Art Database

Change Database Definitions Automatically

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113749D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Romanelli, RJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Structured Query Language (SQL) at the SAA SQL Level 2 definition, provides no way for a database object (a table or a view) to be changed, apart from augmenting an existing object definition. For example, there is no way to drop a column from an object. If this is desired, one must manually copy the data from the object to a temporary object, erase the original object, recreate the original object as desired, and copy the data from the temporary object to the newly created original object. This is just one example of a deficiency that is addressed by this tool.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Change Database Definitions Automatically

      Structured Query Language (SQL) at the SAA SQL Level 2
definition, provides no way for a database object (a table or a view)
to be changed, apart from augmenting an existing object definition.
For example, there is no way to drop a column from an object.  If
this is desired, one must manually copy the data from the object to a
temporary object, erase the original object, recreate the original
object as desired, and copy the data from the temporary object to the
newly created original object.  This is just one example of a
deficiency that is addressed by this tool.

      This disclosure is for a tool that will provide a one-command
interface to automatically rename, change or delete database objects
or columns within an object while maintaining all dependencies on
that object within the database.

      Essentially, the tool will run a sequence of SQL statements
that will perform the desired operation on the database object while
maintaining the dependencies on that object within the database.

      The tool will allow its user to rename objects and columns in
the database, to drop objects and columns from the database, and to
change column definitions within the database.

      The only way that this problem has ever been solved before was
on a case by case level with each user manually doing all the steps
required to modify the database definition.  The problem of the SQL
not providing a quick language verb has not been addressed to my
knowledge.

      Without this tool, changes in database definition are not
simple enough for users who do not know what their optimal database
definition is.  Many of the "low-end" users who want to use a
database in an OS/2* environment simply cannot choose an IBM solution
because of this problem.

      Also, using a tool to make all the changes will ensure that all
changes are made, or that at least the user is notified of the
changes which cannot be made.   In this way, no part of the database
definition which would be affected by a change is left unaffected.

      I would imagine that some database products would incorporate
this function...