Browse Prior Art Database

Improved High Density Area Array Contact Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113902D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Sammakia, BG: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is three new designs for tulip-shaped electrical contact. The tulip-shaped contact is the female part of a high-density area array connector system. The tulip-shaped connector is typically soldered to a board and mates with a pin attached to a thermal conduction module. During mating, the module pin is placed in front of the tulip-shaped contact. An actuation tool is used to drive the pins horizontally between the vertical "ears" on the female part. The new designs prevent the pins from slipping out the back of the connector during actuation by adding material to the back of the female contact.

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Improved High Density Area Array Contact Design

      Disclosed is three new designs for tulip-shaped electrical
contact.  The tulip-shaped contact is the female part of a
high-density area array connector system.  The tulip-shaped connector
is typically soldered to a board and mates with a pin attached to a
thermal conduction module.  During mating, the module pin is placed
in front of the tulip-shaped contact.  An actuation tool is used to
drive the pins horizontally between the vertical "ears" on the female
part.  The new designs prevent the pins from slipping out the back of
the connector during actuation by adding material to the back of the
female contact.

      Fig. 1 shows the stamped shape of the connector, and Fig. 2
shows the shape after folding and slight forming.  Figs. 3-5 show the
stamped shapes for the new designs.  In the first proposed design
(Fig. 3), no material between the contacts ears is removed.  Thus, a
continuous barrier prevents the pin from escaping.  For the second
new design (Fig. 4), two independent ears are formed as in the
original design, but a slab of material restricts the pin from
exiting through the back.  For the final proposed design (Fig. 5) the
two ears are connected by a thin piece of material at the top of the
contact's ears.