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Negotiated Synchronization of Settings for Cooperative Processing Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113904D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Duffield, DM: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Described is a solution for addressing the problem of synchronizing similar characteristics of the client and server parts of a Client/Server application.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Negotiated Synchronization of Settings for Cooperative Processing
Applications

      Described is a solution for addressing the problem of
synchronizing similar characteristics of the client and server parts
of a Client/Server application.

      Cooperative Processing applications execute on two systems,
'cooperating' together to perform work on behalf of the user.  These
systems normally have different hardware, software and capabilities.
For example, the system that interfaces to the user is typically a
Programmable Workstation (PWS) while the other system may be any one
of PWS server, midrange system such as an AS/400* or mainframe
system.  Each system has its own unique capabilities and settings.

      Cooperative applications are faced with providing a seamless
interface to the user using the capabilities of these two systems.
For those capabilities of the systems that are unique (for example
the number of pixels on the screen of the PWS or the method used to
store the data on the host system), this is not a problem.  However,
the application needs to integrate those non-unique capabilities that
exist on both systems.

      One example of this is the language used to interact with the
user (English, French...).  In most cases, the software executing on
both systems on behalf of the application will need to communicate to
the user using this language.  Each system may have a set of
languages available.  Therefore, in order to provide a seamless and
integrated interface to the user, the software on both systems need
to use the same settings, in this example - language.

      The solution to this problem is for the application to
negotiate the settings between the two portions of the application
(running on two different systems) to arrive at mutually agreed to
settings.  This negotiation can be initiated or controlled from
either system, depending on the actual setting...