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"Memory Lite" Menu System for Acoustic Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000113965D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Porter, LL: AUTHOR

Abstract

When using acoustic applications (such as voice mail, telephone banking) users get lost and confused very easily. This is mainly because of the limitations of human short term memory. The more acoustic information presented to users: 1. The less likely they are to remember the list of current options available. 2. The more navigationally disoriented they become. They lose track of where they are in the menu tree and don't know how to get to the next function they need.

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"Memory Lite" Menu System for Acoustic Applications

      When using acoustic applications (such as voice mail, telephone
banking) users get lost and confused very easily.  This is mainly
because of the limitations of human short term memory.  The more
acoustic information presented to users:
 1.  The less likely they are to remember the list of current options
    available.
 2.  The more navigationally disoriented they become.  They lose
track
    of where they are in the menu tree and don't know how to get to
    the next function they need.

      The solution is a menu-design which reduces the load on
acoustic short term memory.  The solution has two components:
 1.  A partially event-driven design.  A proportion of the menu
    options are always available on every menu in the system.  This
    has the effect of "hot keys", allowing immediate navigation to
    the most frequently used functions in the system.  In an acoustic
    application driven through a telephone interface there are
    typically only 12 menu options possible - the 12 keys on the
    telephone keypad.  Since there are potentially hundreds of
    functions accessible in the application, only a subset (typically
    3-4) can be made available as hot keys for direct navigation.

          An example is a design for a voice mail system where keys
    1, 2, 3 and 0 are available at every point in the system to
    navigate to the basi...