Browse Prior Art Database

Diskless Magnetic Recording Drive with Spinning Heads

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114003D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 69K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boutaghou, ZE: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A method to store magnetic data which eliminates the need for a spinning disk is disclosed. Magnetic recording is achieved using a spinning head-arm-motor assembly mounted on a conventional linear or rotary actuator. The recording and readback signals are transported to and from the spinning structure in much the same way as in helical scan video recorders. The magnetic media is in the form of a stationary rectangular plate, which has more available surface area for recording per Direct Access Storage Device (DASD) footprint than conventional drives.

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Diskless Magnetic Recording Drive with Spinning Heads

      A method to store magnetic data which eliminates the need for a
spinning disk is disclosed.  Magnetic recording is achieved using a
spinning head-arm-motor assembly mounted on a conventional linear or
rotary actuator.  The recording and readback signals are transported
to and from the spinning structure in much the same way as in helical
scan video recorders.  The magnetic media is in the form of a
stationary rectangular plate, which has more available surface area
for recording per Direct Access Storage Device (DASD) footprint than
conventional drives.

      This invention eliminates the rotational motion of the media
which in the classical technology consists of a spindle with at least
one spinning disk.  In the disclosed method, the magnetic recording
is provided by a spinning head-arm-motor assembly mounted to an
actuation device that can be either linear or rotary.  The digital
information to be recorded is encoded with a Direct Current (DC) free
code so that the signals can pass through the rotary transformer.
This uses a technology similar to that commonly found in video or
data tape helical scanning heads.  However in this case, the head or
heads are positioned to fly over a rectangular flat plate medium.

      The data is written in arcs of about 1/3 revolution starting at
one end of the plate and successively offset towards the center of
the plate using displacement provided by the actuator.  Similar arcs
are also written from the opposite end toward the center.  Shorter
arcs are used near the center of the plate to prevent overlap of the
written arcs from the two directions.  The spacing between successive
arcs is not uniform, but has more separation along the cen...