Browse Prior Art Database

Bay Structures for Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association Cards

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114009D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 174K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Baker, RG: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed are bay structures including guide slots and connectors for removably receiving various types of cards built according to the standards of the Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association (PCMCIA). These bay structures further include particular devices to solve thermal, electromagnetic radiation, mechanical restraint, and security problems associated with the releasable engagement and use of cards of this kind within a personal computing system.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 41% of the total text.

Bay Structures for Personal Computer Memory Card Industry Association
Cards

      Disclosed are bay structures including guide slots and
connectors for removably receiving various types of cards built
according to the standards of the Personal Computer Memory Card
Industry Association (PCMCIA).  These bay structures further include
particular devices to solve thermal, electromagnetic radiation,
mechanical restraint, and security problems associated with the
releasable engagement and use of cards of this kind within a personal
computing system.

      Fig. 1 shows a card 10 built in accordance with PCMCIA
standards.  The basic portion 12 of the card 10 includes side edges
14, configured for sliding into a slot of a card-receiving structure
(not shown), and a number of apertures 16 extending in two rows along
an insertion edge 18.  Receptacles (not shown) lie behind apertures
16 to connect various circuits within the card 10 with pins extending
from a mating connector (not shown).  These cards are used, both in
laptop systems and in desktop systems, providing, for example, a
processor memory, communications functions, or serving as a
replacement for rotating memory media.

      A number of different types of cards built in accordance with
these standards are commercially available.  For example, while card
10 includes a main portion 12 and an extended portion 20, most cards
include only the main portion 12, extending to an edge indicated by
dashed line 22.  A card built to this standard may be one of several
thicknesses, due to the size of a box structure 24 extending along
the basic portion 12 at the top of the card, and due to a thinner box
structure (not shown) extending similarly along the bottom of the
card.  Type 1 cards are the thinnest of these cards, being configured
without these outward-extending box structures to have a thickness of
3.3 mm.  That is, the upper and lower surfaces of Type 1 cards are
flat.  Type 2 cards have an overall thickness of 5.0 mm, and Type 3
cards have an overall thickness of 10.5 mm.  Since side edges 12 and
insertion edge 18 do not vary with card thickness, a single connector
and card-receiving structure can engage cards of these various types,
as long as provision is made for extending box structures, such as
box structure 24.

      Figs. 2-4 show examples of the external configurations of bay
structures constructed in three versions to accommodate different
types of cards built to PCMCIA standards.  Each bay includes one or
more slots, extending along a surface of a computing device for the
removable insertion of card(s) to engage connector(s) (not shown)
within the bays.  The bay structure of Fig. 1 can accept four Type 1
cards 26.  The bay structure of Fig. 3 can accept two Type 1 cards or
two Type 2 cards 28.  The bay structure of Fig. 4 can accept one Type
1 card, one Type 2 card, or one Type 3 card 30.

      Heat dissipating structures are provided within the bay...