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Displaying Relative Precision in a Ranked List of Search Matches

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114069D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pinter, RY: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

When presenting the results of computer literature and similar searches, matches are customarily displayed as lists of topics where the matches for the given search query are found. These lists display the topics in a ranked order, where a higher rank corresponds to a more precise match. However, no indication is given as to the relative precision of the topics in the list. Thus, the user has difficulty interpreting the results, especially in the case where there are many topics in the list.

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Displaying Relative Precision in a Ranked List of Search Matches

      When presenting the results of computer literature and similar
searches, matches are customarily displayed as lists of topics where
the matches for the given search query are found.  These lists
display the topics in a ranked order, where a higher rank corresponds
to a more precise match.  However, no indication is given as to the
relative precision of the topics in the list.  Thus, the user has
difficulty interpreting the results, especially in the case where
there are many topics in the list.

      This difficulty is overcome by presenting topics with search
matches together with a clear graphical indication of the rank of
each item using an additional column, e.g., to the left of the topic
identifier, where a colored square is displayed.  Alternatively, on
operating systems which allow it, the search match information is
itself written in that color.

      The purity of the color or the color itself (i.e., the RGB
index) would correspond to the precision of the search match; that is
to say, the parameter controlling the color is determined by the
number which was used to determine the ordering of the items in the
list.  The first item in the list, representing the best match, is
displayed at the highest possible purity or in the color at the high
end of the spectrum (fire red).

      Using the first approach, the result is a vertical bar which
progresses from a pure color to dither color as it approaches the
bottom of the list; with the alternative a...