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Security, License Management and Application Metering Process for Controlling Applications in the DOS Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114099D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 6 page(s) / 208K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Erickson, DE: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method for performing security, license management, application control and application metering functions in the DOS environment is disclosed. This method utilizes a small (less than 1K bytes) Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR) program to detect program execution and to invoke the desired security, license management, application control and/or application metering functions. The processing of the desired functions are external to the TSR. This method provides the desired controls for all DOS programs and does not require modifications to the controlled programs.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 29% of the total text.

Security, License Management and Application Metering Process for
Controlling Applications in the DOS Environment

      A method for performing security, license management,
application control and application metering functions in the DOS
environment is disclosed.  This method utilizes a small (less than 1K
bytes) Terminate and Stay Resident (TSR) program to detect program
execution and to invoke the desired security, license management,
application control and/or application metering functions.  The
processing of the desired functions are external to the TSR.  This
method provides the desired controls for all DOS programs and does
not require modifications to the controlled programs.

      In the normal DOS environment, there are three programs
involved in the execution of an application program (Fig. 1).  These
three programs are:
  1.  the invoking program,
  2.  DOS,
  3.  the target application program.

      When security, license management, application control or
application metering is required in the DOS system, an additional
program is needed.  This additional program is usually a fairly large
and complex program.  It is executed when DOS is initialized and then
TSR (Fig. 2).  The four programs in this model are:
  1.  the invoking program,
  2.  the control TSR,
  3.  DOS,
  4.  the target application program.

      There are problems with this approach that are solved with the
new method described below.  These problems are:
  o  The TSR uses a large amount of the available memory; thus, many
      of the user's applications cannot be executed.
  o  Only one function can easily be performed by the TSR.  It is
      difficult to provide security, license management and
application
      metering functions in the same TSR.
  o  Nested target application programs cannot be supported with
      concurrent use license management or with application metering.

      The new method herein alleviates these problems by implementing
the functions of the TSR program in multiple programs.  These
functional programs are:
  1.  The trapping TSR program
  2.  The synchronizing program
  3.  The control program(s)
      o  A security program
      o  A license control or application control program
      o  An application metering program

      The purpose of the trapping TSR is to detect requests to "Load
and Execute" other programs.  It will automatically allow the
execution of specific, predefined programs, such as COMMAND.COM.  For
other programs, it will invoke the syncronizing program to handle the
desired control operations.  It also provides a "Special Load and
Execute" function which is used by the syncronizing and control
programs.  This special function allows these programs to "Load and
Execute" other programs or applications while bypassing the desired
control operations.  This TSR program requires less than 1K bytes of
resid...