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Browse Prior Art Database

Resolving Ambiguous Parsing Rules

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114103D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 103K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Weber, OW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system which ensures the appropriate mapping of ambiguous address book fields for use by a synchronization program. This is accomplished by defining system default rules to either accommodate known exceptions or to inform the user of potential error situations.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Resolving Ambiguous Parsing Rules

      Disclosed is a system which ensures the appropriate mapping of
ambiguous address book fields for use by a synchronization program.
This is accomplished by defining system default rules to either
accommodate known exceptions or to inform the user of potential error
situations.

      Products such as ABS/2* synchronize one address book with
another, such as synchronizing a ccMail** data base with a VM Callup
data base.  To prepare for the synchronization, the system
administrator must define how the fields of each data base are going
to be mapped to each other.  Parse rules are made available to break
a source field into multiple master fields.  This allows mapping to
be accomplished at a more granular level and allows users to move
data from directories supporting different formats while maintaining
the correct format in each environment.  Examples of types of parse
rules that may prove useful are:
  o  Breaking a complete name into its component parts.
  o  Breaking a phone number into area code, exchange, and number.

Following is an example of how one might parse a telephone number
into its component parts:
  Source field:  PHONE:  (817)555-1212:  !MAREA!
                                         !MEXCHANGE!
                                         !MNUMBER!

The following parse rule will fill the destination fields with the
correct data:
                (!MAREA!) !MEXCHANGE!-!MNUMBER!

      However, a problem exists if there is a record in the data base
that doesn't conform to this mapping.  For example, phone numbers are
sometimes entered without any punctuation, such as the parameters for
making a call via a modem.  In cases like these, the synchronization
program is broken, either terminating or mapping the fields
incorrectly unbenounced to the user.  The disclosed system ensures
the appropriate mapping even in these ambiguous situations by
defining system default rules to either accommodate known exceptions
or to inform the user of potential error situations.

      Continuing with the above phone number example, the
administrator can define the following system default rules, based
upon the length (number of non-blank characters contained in) the
phone number field:
    Length           Assumed Format             Example
    ------   -----------------------------   -------------
     >13     Message to user
      13     (!MAREA!)!MEXCHANGE!-!MNUMBER!  (817)555-1212
      12     (!MAREA!)!MEXCHANGE!!MNUMBER!   (817)5551212
      11     !MAREA!!MEXCHANGE!-!MNUMBER!    817555-1212
      10     !MAREA!!MEXCHANGE!!MNUMBER!     8175551212
       9     Message to user
       8     !MEXCHANGE!-!MNUMBER!           555-1212
       7  ...