Browse Prior Art Database

Acoustic Entry/Exit Muffler for Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114110D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 99K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Medlin, BW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Maximum noise emission requirements typically apply when designing a printer. One of the prime exit points for noise is the slot for document entry and exit. It is difficult to block the noise from exiting the printer without creating document handling problems. A representative printer is shown in Fig. 1.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 74% of the total text.

Acoustic Entry/Exit Muffler for Printer

      Maximum noise emission requirements typically apply when
designing a printer.  One of the prime exit points for noise is the
slot for document entry and exit.  It is difficult to block the noise
from exiting the printer without creating document handling problems.
A representative printer is shown in Fig. 1.

      The problem is to prevent noise generated inside printer from
exiting via the document entry/exit slot, and to do it inexpensively
and without adversely affecting the document handling
characteristics.

      Disclosed is a device which blocks/absorbs much of the noise
that normally would exit the document entry/exit slot by relying on
the fact that very little noise travels parallel to the document
path.  Most noise that exits the printer does so by constantly
reflecting off surfaces until it finds its way out.  By providing an
"acoustically soft" region near the document entry/exit slot much of
the noise that would otherwise exit can be absorbed.

      A muffler region is constructed by perforating a support plate
1 that makes up the document entry/exit slot shown in Fig. 2, and
placing noise absorptive material 3, such as foam, over this area, as
shown in Fig. 3.  The perforations in the support plate 1 may be in
the shape of a diamond to aid in document passage.

      Barrier material 2, such as plastic, shown in Fig. 3, is placed
on the top surface of the absorptive material 3 to preven...