Browse Prior Art Database

Look-Ahead State Machine Algorithm for Protocol Improvement in a Communication System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114127D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 124K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ng, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

Performance is a critical factor in communication systems. The present disclosure provides performance improvement in communication systems.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 38% of the total text.

Look-Ahead

State

Machine Algorithm for Protocol Improvement in a
Communication System

      Performance is a critical factor in communication systems.  The
present disclosure provides performance improvement in communication
systems.

      This paper provides a mechanism for designing a communication
protocol that increases the rate of information reception.

      In a normal communication exchange, there is a definite set of
rules that will be triggered once a particular frame or packet of
information is received.  By changing the interpretation of the frame
so it can anticipate future incoming frames or activities during
transmission lag time, the efficiency of transmission can be
improved.

      The key factor in effectively looking ahead is to determine the
probability of realization of a particular event.  The higher the
probability, the more efficient the look-ahead mechanism to the
overall communication.  There are a number of ways to increase the
probability of anticipation and one design using a Look-Ahead State
Machine (LASM) is described hereinafter.

      The Look-Ahead-State-Machine (LASM) is built upon the concept
of a finite state machine.  When designing a computer program, a
problem can be reduced to a set of operations which depend only upon
the current state of the program.  Such a computer model is called a
finite state process.  One usual representation of this finite state
model is by way of a state table where the rows of the table define
the states of the program and the columns define the possible
conditions or inputs to the program in the specific states (Fig. 1).
The intersectional box defines the possible actions to be taken and
the next state that the program will enter.  In communication
systems, most protocols are designed in accordance with this finite
state model.
                                STATES
                       1          2         3
                   --------------------------------
                I1 | A1,2     | A6,2    | A11,1   |
                   |----------|---------|---------|
                I2 | A2,3     | A7,3    | A12,3   |
                   |----------|---------|---------|
  CONDITIONS    I3 | A3,1     | A8,3    | A13,1   |
                   |----------|---------|---------|
                I4 | A4,2     | A9,3    | A14,2   |
                   |----------|---------|---------|
                I5 | A5,3     | A10,1   | A15,1   |
                   --------------------------------

      FIGURE 1 - EXAMPLE OF A STATE TABLE

      Mathematically, this can be abstracted by defining a finite
state automaton as a 5-tuple space M = (S,I,d,s,F), where:
   S - is a f...