Browse Prior Art Database

OS/2 Tape Programming Application Programmable Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114198D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 61K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Abbondanzio, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Described is a set or Tape Programming Application Programmable Interfaces (APIs) allowing OS/2* 2x to read and write tapes which are compatible with a number of existing tape backup applications. Support for new tape formats and devices may be added to the system in an incremental manner without replacing existing modules.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 66% of the total text.

OS/2 Tape Programming Application Programmable Interface

      Described is a set or Tape Programming Application Programmable
Interfaces (APIs) allowing OS/2* 2x to read and write tapes which are
compatible with a number of existing tape backup applications.
Support for new tape formats and devices may be added to the system
in an incremental manner without replacing existing modules.

      The Figure is a block diagram showing how the interfaces
associated with Tape device/Backup application support are divided
into the categories of WORKPLACE SHELL* user interface support 10,
tape logical format support 12, and device driver support 14.  The
device drivers operate with tape device hardware 16.  The separation
of tasks in this way allows the user to add support for new tape
devices and/or tape logical formats in an incremental fashion without
having to replace the entire tape subsystem.

      Since OS/2 provides a default backup application, a uniform
user interface can be provided across various tape drives and
existing backup formats.  For example, the user interface can provide
a tape drive icon 18 to allow selection of the tape drive in the File
Manager, in the way that disk drives are selected by icons.  A third
part application using the tape drive may also be provided with an
icon 20, and other devices, such as drop down menus 22 may be
employed.

      The device driver interfaces define an efficient data transport
model between the tape back...