Browse Prior Art Database

Display of Animation Sequences

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114213D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Todd, SJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

While current personal computers are capable of handling the data processing associated with continuous animation the transfer of the large amounts of data involved presents a problem. Thus, sequences that can be held in RAM can be displayed at a reasonable rate, but transfer from hard disk or CD ROM cannot keep up with animation rates. The problem can be addressed by using dedicated video cards, but these tend to be expensive.

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Display of Animation Sequences

      While current personal computers are capable of handling the
data processing associated with continuous animation the transfer of
the large amounts of data involved presents a problem.  Thus,
sequences that can be held in RAM can be displayed at a reasonable
rate, but transfer from hard disk or CD ROM cannot keep up with
animation rates.  The problem can be addressed by using dedicated
video cards, but these tend to be expensive.

      A less expensive alternative is to organise the computer's RAM
as a double buffer, and to divide the animation into circular
sequences that fit into either buffer.  One sequence can be played
repetitively until another can be read into the second buffer.  On an
8meg machine each buffer would be around 3.5meg, enough to hold 112
uncompressed 256*256 4bit frames, or about 10 seconds of low quality
animation.

      The sequences should be joined up as linked rings.  Each
sequence may have several neighbouring sequences, with one frame in
common between any sequence and each neighbour.  After each sequence
is played, the next sequence to be shown can be any neighbouring
linked sequence.  The overall animation may thus be played in a huge
number of ways.

      On machines with larger memory, pairs of linked sequences could
be read together into a buffer and played in figure of 8 form to
double the time before repetition.