Browse Prior Art Database

Accelerated Wire Embedding Honoring Pre-Wires in Chip Physical Design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114304D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brennan, TC: AUTHOR

Abstract

An accelerated method for embedding wires on chip physical design with particular honoring of pre-wires is described. Present day integrated circuits are large and dense and have up to five wiring levels. Present day tools for manual edits of wires can display only about a 100 by 100 grid of chips that now have up to 6000 by 6000 wiring channels. The problem is to handle wire edits (or embedding) faster to get to market faster, as well as preserving pre-wires which are often of very critical design due to timing or noise considerations.

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Accelerated Wire Embedding Honoring Pre-Wires in Chip Physical Design

      An accelerated method for embedding wires on chip physical
design with particular honoring of pre-wires is described.  Present
day integrated circuits are large and dense and have up to five
wiring levels.  Present day tools for manual edits of wires can
display only about a 100 by 100 grid of chips that now have up to
6000 by 6000 wiring channels.  The problem is to handle wire edits
(or embedding) faster to get to market faster, as well as preserving
pre-wires which are often of very critical design due to timing or
noise considerations.

      The basic solution is to utilize the computer in finding open
channels as opposed to manually looking around the chip.  This is
done by the user selecting a bounding box around two points needing
to be connected.  The computer then "floods" this window with
segments in any open channels as opposed to the user finding open
channels and adding wire manually.  The primary control over the
added segments will be the window, but additional controls can be
added such as what planes are allowed, wrong way jogs, etc.  (For
example, a user could specify segments that could be added on planes
2 and 3 with wrong way jogs of length 1 allowed.)  The user then
proceeds to finish the connection as before but with a lot of
"clues", and unwanted segments are removed with the REMOVE_ANTENNAS
command upon completion of the connection.