Browse Prior Art Database

Buckling Beam Mezzanine Connector Actuator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114357D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Campbell, JS: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Typically, high I/O buckling beam connectors require high compressive forces to actuate. Even though individual buckling beam springs may only require as little as 50g to compress, when large numbers of such springs are present, the total force required to compress all the springs is significantly high. Typical applications of over 500 I/O connectors may require in excess of over 50 pounds continuous compressive force to reliably actuate. Developing this compressive force in a ergonomically simple action utilizing common hand tools is a challenging engineering problem.

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Buckling Beam Mezzanine Connector Actuator

      Typically, high I/O buckling beam connectors require high
compressive forces to actuate.  Even though individual buckling beam
springs may only require as little as 50g to compress, when large
numbers of such springs are present, the total force required to
compress all the springs is significantly high.  Typical applications
of over 500 I/O connectors may require in excess of over 50 pounds
continuous compressive force to reliably actuate.  Developing this
compressive force in a ergonomically simple action utilizing common
hand tools is a challenging engineering problem.

      Previous designs have used screws, which pose numerous human
factors problems: not knowing how tight to tighten the screws,
handling of loose parts, and uneven compression during actuation.

      The disclosed invention can be described in summary as a
actuator for a buckling beam mezzanine connector which offers an
ergonomically simple action to reliably compress the connector.  The
actuator can be easily actuated by the use of simple hand tools, such
as a screw driver.  The screw driver will engage two 1/2 turn rotary
cams which provide the compression action.

      The actuator is a fixed displacement device which utilizes
internal compressive springs to maintain the compressive force.  When
the cams are actuated they displace their engaging member a fixed
displacement, while compressing springs which accommodate system
tole...