Browse Prior Art Database

Multi-Character H-To-Hawaii Search Capability

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114365D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 108K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Johnson, DK: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The concept of an H-to-Hawaii search in an OS/2* Presentation Manager* (PM) graphical user interface is well known. It is used in list boxes and containers to quickly scroll to a desired entry. When one of these controls has the input focus and the user types a character on the keyboard, the next entry in the control, either a list item or a record in the container, whose text starts with the letter typed is selected and scrolled into view if previously hidden. While this is a good usability feature for quick navigation to a general area in the control, it has severe limitations due to the use of only a single character for the search.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 49% of the total text.

Multi-Character H-To-Hawaii Search Capability

      The concept of an H-to-Hawaii search in an OS/2* Presentation
Manager* (PM) graphical user interface is well known.  It is used in
list boxes and containers to quickly scroll to a desired entry.  When
one of these controls has the input focus and the user types a
character on the keyboard, the next entry in the control, either a
list item or a record in the container, whose text starts with the
letter typed is selected and scrolled into view if previously hidden.
While this is a good usability feature for quick navigation to a
general area in the control, it has severe limitations due to the use
of only a single character for the search.

      List boxes and containers can sometimes contain thousands of
entries.  For example, a large corporation may be running an
application that lists all of the users of the network in a single
container.  Each user would be represented by a single icon with the
user's name below it as the icon text.  With possibly tens of
thousands of records listed in the container, searching based on a
single character is not much use.  There may be thousands of records
whose text begins with the same single typed character.  Once this
group is found, the users of the system will then have to manually
scroll through the long list of matching records looking for the one
specific record they want.

      The solution to this problem is to allow the users to search
these large controls using a multi-character search technique that
allows them to search on as many of the leading characters of the
text as they know.  Multi-character H-to-Hawaii support allows the
users of large systems to quickly and automatically scroll to the
desired record in large lists as easily as the present
single-character H-to-Hawaii allows in small lists.

      Two hot-keys are defined to be used to implement this
capability.  The first is used to display a dialog that allows the
user to type in the string for which they are searching.  The second
is used to repeat the previous search, finding the next record in the
list that matches the search.  Because a hot-key needs to be pressed
in order to use this new functionality, the current single-character
search support provided by the system can still be used when it is
appropriate, such as in a small container.

      The dialog will consist of an entry field for the users to
enter the search string, and a check box to indicate whether the
search should be case sensitive.  The single-character search
provided by PM is never case sensitive, because names are usually not
case sensitive in OS/2.  However, network management systems can
interface with other operating systems that are case sensitive, such
as AIX*.  A case sensitive search is useful in such situations.

      When the search is activated by the users pressing a pushbutton
on the dialog, the next record after the record that currently has
the focus w...