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Browse Prior Art Database

Application Programming Interface for Managing Disk Operating System Private Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114418D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 74K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Callaway, JR: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is an application programming interface for management of DOS private applications.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Application Programming Interface for Managing Disk Operating System
Private Applications

      Disclosed is an application programming interface for
management of DOS private applications.

      In IBM OS/2* LAN Server, Application Program Interfaces (APIs)
exist for management of three kinds of network applications: DOS
public applications, OS/2 public applications, and OS/2 private
applications.  A public application is one that is created by an
administrator and that can be made available for use by all network
users.  A private application is one that is created either by an
administrator or a user, for use only by that single user.

      Local Area Network (LAN) users that are logged on to the
network via DOS LAN Requester (DLR) software have the capability of
creating private DOS applications through the DLR full-screen
interface.  However, if these same users log on to the LAN at an OS/2
requester, their DOS private applications are not available to them.

      Application definitions are stored on a domain controller in
domain control database (DCDB) files.  APIs exist for management of
the three supported network application types; they serve to hide
details such as location and format of the DCDB files from the user.
However, older versions of the LAN Server and DLR software read data
directly from the DCDB files rather than using APIs to obtain the
data, and thus are dependent on the location, content, and format of
the database files.

      A new application type, APP_DOS_PRIVATE, was created so that
existing APIs could be used for management of this application type.
Storing the definition of this new application type in existing DCDB
files would introduce incompatibilities with downlevel software,
since the older software expects the contents of these files to
conform to certain formats and to be restricted to a set of known
values, and data specific to DOS private applications takes on new
values.  To solve this problem, a new DCDB file was created that
contains on...