Browse Prior Art Database

Event Monitors

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114494D
Original Publication Date: 1994-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-28
Document File: 2 page(s) / 68K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boivin, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method for monitoring transient database events (e.g., deadlocks, SQL statements, transactions) is disclosed. A new database object called an "event monitor" can be defined via SQL, and its definition is maintained in the system catalogs. The event monitor records information about specified database events in a target location (e.g., file, named pipe) when the events occur.

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Event Monitors

      A method for monitoring transient database events (e.g.,
deadlocks, SQL statements, transactions) is disclosed.  A new
database object called an "event monitor" can be defined via SQL, and
its definition is maintained in the system catalogs.  The event
monitor records information about specified database events in a
target location (e.g., file, named pipe) when the events occur.

      In order to monitor transient database events, the database
itself must be aware that someone wishes to perform monitoring, in
advance of the event's occurance.  Event monitors meet this need.

      An event monitor is a new kind of database object that tells
the database which events to monitor, and where the monitor
information should be written when the event occurs.  A user can
create and drop event monitors by using the SQL statements, "CREATE
EVENT MONITOR" and "DROP EVENT MONITOR" respectively.  In addition,
users can activiate and deactivate previously created event monitors
using the "SET EVENT MONITOR" SQL statement.

      When using the CREATE EVENT MONITOR statement, the user
specifies the following information (see the Figure for a sample SQL
syntax):
  o  The name of the event monitor.  This name is used to refer to
the
      event monitor in the DROP and SET statements.
  o  A list of the types of events that are to be monitored (e.g.,
      Deadlocks, transactions, statements, connections, etc).
   In addition to being able to pick which types of events the
    event monitor should record, users can also have the event
    monitor limit the event data to events that are generated by
    specific applications or users.
 ...