Browse Prior Art Database

Combination Integrated Circuit Socket/Heat Sink

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114592D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 32K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bellar, RJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A method to enhance thermal transfer from integrated circuit chips is disclosed. An integrated circuit chip socket is fabricated from a thermally conductive and high dielectric strength material such as aluminum nitride ceramic.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Combination Integrated Circuit Socket/Heat Sink

      A method to enhance thermal transfer from integrated circuit
chips is disclosed.  An integrated circuit chip socket is fabricated
from a thermally conductive and high dielectric strength material
such as aluminum nitride ceramic.

      A thermally conductive, high dielectric material such as
aluminum nitride ceramic is molded into an integrated circuit socket.
A high percentage of the heat generated in integrated circuit devices
is conducted through the pins or contacts of such devices into the
circuit board.  The circuit board's ability to dissipate this
unwanted heat is dependent on many factors including the cross
sectional area of lands and size of vias.  Some pins on the device
will be subjected to only a low heat flux because of their function
in the circuit while others will be subjected to more heat flux then
they can normally conduct into the circuit board.  Using a material
like aluminum nitride, the devices are thermally connected by a
material with a high thermal conductivity and the heat is spread
equally over all the pins.  This enhances thermal paths into the
circuit board.

      The aluminum nitride socket can also be raised above the
circuit board and/or placed in a forced air stream to allow
additional convectional cooling.  Fins can be molded into the socket
for an even larger cooling effect.