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Browse Prior Art Database

Local Area Network Server Replacement Procedure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114645D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 92K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jensen, B: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a process by which a series of Local Area Network (LAN) client machines can dynamically switch from one LAN server to another. The name of this procedure is the LAN Server Replacement Procedure (LSRP).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Local Area Network Server Replacement Procedure

      Disclosed is a process by which a series of Local Area Network
(LAN) client machines can dynamically switch from one LAN server to
another.  The name of this procedure is the LAN Server Replacement
Procedure (LSRP).

      LAN servers have become a key element of the LAN network
because of their resource sharing ability.  Programs used by
individual client machines on a LAN can be stored in one place, on a
server, reducing the storage requirements for each client machine.
The problem with the current LAN server design occurs when a LAN
server is taken down by either a problem that causes the machine to
lose communications with the LAN or for a scheduled outage for
maintenance or upgrade.  In order to use another machine for the LAN
server, all the client machines must be re-booted, which can impact a
customer's business.  LSRP was invented to correct this problem.

      LSRP is a methodology by which one or more client machines are
notified when a LAN server is being taken down and a new server
dynamically assigned.  LSRP consists of a LAN Server Control (LSC)
application on each machine attached to the LAN.  The LSC application
controls and assigns the identity of the LAN server.  The LSC
application on the server machine provides a full-screen interface by
which a user can select a secondary LAN server at the time of a
scheduled outage of the primary server.  A default secondary server
name is specified at LSC install time to indicate which server is in
control if a nonscheduled outage (for example, a machine failure)
occurs.  Each client machine contains a copy of the LSC application,
which receives commands from the server LSC application.

      When a server machine is being brought down for a scheduled
outage, the LSC application is given control.  Through the
full-screen interface, the backup server is specified by the user.
The identify of the backup server is placed in an LSC packet and
transmitted to all client machines on the LAN.  The format of the
packet follows:
       Command       Primary       Secondary
         ID          Server         Server

      The Command ID field identifies the three actions:  Switch
Server, Return Server, Identify Secondary Default Server.  When the
server is to be taken down, a Swi...