Browse Prior Art Database

Speed-Sensitive Scroll Widgets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114736D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Spall, RP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a variation of the standard user interface scrolling widget, which incorporates a 'speed sensitive' component. The proposed design will allow users to determine their actual scrolling speed through direct manipulation of the scroll widget itself.

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Speed-Sensitive Scroll Widgets

      Disclosed is a variation of the standard user interface
scrolling widget, which incorporates a 'speed sensitive' component.
The
proposed design will allow users to determine their actual scrolling
speed through direct manipulation of the scroll widget itself.

      Scrolling widgets are common place in many user interfaces.  As
shown by the "

Normal

" label in the Figure, these widgets typically
take the form of a single graphical arrow head which may point in the
up, down, right, or left direction.  Behaving in a similar way to
regular user interface buttons, when pressed or activated, the arrow
icon causes appropriate scrolling behaviour.  The scrolling then
continues until the user depresses or deactivates the icon.  The
direction of the arrow head indicates the scrolling direction, and
scrolling widgets are usually coupled together with another control
to which the scrolling behaviour is applied, e.g., a scroll bar for
scrolling through a document.

      However, scrolling widgets typically only scroll at a single
speed, while they are being held down.  If additional control over
scrolling speed is required, then additional scrolling widgets must
be added, for example separate scroll icons for line and page
scrolling within a document.  This effectively uses additional screen
space, which may be of premium in certain interfaces.  Alternatively,
a settings dialog must be provided which allows the user to configure
the scrolling speed(s) for a specific application.

      To address this limitation,  an enhancement to the standard
scroll widget is proposed.  As shown in the Figure, division of the
arrow graphic into smaller sections provides an additional dimension
which can be mapped onto speed.  Depending upon the location of the
mouse pointer, the appropriate arrow sub-section is highlighted.  In
the example given, three sub-sections are provided and are mapped
onto slow, medium, and fast scrolling.  As soon as the scroll widget
is activated...