Browse Prior Art Database

Use of a Binary Intermediate Language to Compile to an Alien Codeset

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114759D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 51K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cooper, HNH: AUTHOR

Abstract

A method is disclosed for compiling a program in such a way that character data in the program is encoded using a different coding scheme from the one used by the machine on which the program runs. The method avoids changing either the compiler or the program itself.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 60% of the total text.

Use of a Binary Intermediate Language to Compile to an Alien Codeset

      A method is disclosed for compiling a program in such a way
that character data in the program is encoded using a different
coding scheme from the one used by the machine on which the program
runs.  The method avoids changing either the compiler or the program
itself.

      Compilers are programs that take a computer program written in
a human-readable programming language, such as COBOL or C, and from
it generate an executable program for a specific kind of computer.

      Modern programming language compilers are typically built in
two parts:  a "front end" that accepts a program written in a
programming language such as C or COBOL; and a "back end" that
accepts output from the front end and generates a program that will
execute on a certain kind of processor.

      Normally, both parts of a compiler are built (compiled) on the
platform on which the compiler, as well as any programs it will
produce, are to be run.  Character literals in the program are
therefore encoded (by the front end of the compiler) in the normal
character set of that platform:  e.g., ASCII or EBCDIC.

      The technique here disclosed is to compile a program with a
compiler, the two parts of which run on platforms that use different
code sets, and where both parts were built on the assumption they
were part of a conventional compiler for that platform rather than
part of a cross-compiler (a special...