Browse Prior Art Database

Cooperative Collision Avoidance System

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114787D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Osborn, NA: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a collision avoidance system for aircraft or ships based on cooperation and communication between peers. Each ship or aircraft in a region is equipped with an accurate navigational system e.g., the Global Positioning System (GPS) and with the means to transmit its location to similar vessels nearby. In this way, a distributed system of collision avoidance is provided without relying on central control.

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Cooperative Collision Avoidance System

      Disclosed is a collision avoidance system for aircraft or ships
based on cooperation and communication between peers.  Each ship or
aircraft in a region is equipped with an accurate navigational system
e.g., the Global Positioning System (GPS) and with the means to
transmit its location to similar vessels nearby.  In this way, a
distributed system of collision avoidance is provided without relying
on central control.

      The GPS system computes its three-dimensional position through
radio signals received from several navigational satellites.
Military units are said to be capable of accuracies better than 30
feet, and civilian units are also very accurate [*].

      The Figure is a block diagram of the collision avoidance
system.  A GPS receiver 1, receiving the satellite signals, is
connected to, or integral with, a general purpose navigational unit
2.  A dedicated Collision Navigational Unit (CNU) 3 is connected to
the GPS receiver 1 and to a combination Terminal Navigation
Controller (TNC) and radio 4.  The CNU 3 receives regular updates of
the vehicle's position from GPS 1.  These updates may also include
course and velocity information.  The CNU 3, a special-purpose
computer which may include processing enhancements for trigonometric
functions used in navigation, generates a frame of information,
including the vehicle's identification, position, course, and
velocity, sending this information to the TNC/radio 4, which is
connected to an antenna 5 and to a display (not shown) in the
aircraft cockpit or on the bridge of the ship.  The TNC/radio
broadcasts this frame of information on a specific common VHF or UHF
frequency, using a Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) protocol.

      Since such frequencies propagate essentially in a line of sight
fashion...