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Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Making a Peripheral Device Usable on Multiple Operating Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114836D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-29
Document File: 2 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frazier, GR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Peripheral devices using the Small Computer System Interface (SCSI) must often must be customized to a particular operating system. This is because parameters within the device which control command queuing, error recovery, and other behavior must be slightly different for each operating system. Today's systems solve this problem by offering slightly different versions of each device. For example, a single device often has a unique part number for each customer. The only difference between devices with different part numbers is the parameter settings. Tracking multiple part numbers for each customer causes unneeded tracking expense and expense due to maintaining multiple inventories. The described concept provides the means for eliminating the necessity of multiple part numbers to support multiple systems.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 58% of the total text.

Method for Making a Peripheral Device Usable on Multiple Operating
Systems

      Peripheral devices using the Small Computer System Interface
(SCSI) must often must be customized to a particular operating
system.  This is because  parameters within the device which control
command queuing, error recovery, and other behavior must be slightly
different for each operating system.  Today's systems solve this
problem by offering slightly different versions of each device.  For
example, a single device often has a unique part number for each
customer.  The only difference between devices with different part
numbers is the parameter settings.  Tracking multiple part numbers
for each customer causes unneeded tracking expense and expense due to
maintaining multiple inventories.  The described concept provides the
means for eliminating the necessity of multiple part numbers to
support multiple systems.

      In order to solve this problem, multiple sets of system-unique
parameters are stored within the device itself.  A device needing to
be customized by 5 systems, for example, stores customized parameters
for each of the 5 systems.  Each set of system-unique parameters is
preceded by a "system ID" which specifies the system to which the
parameters apply.  When each system begins to use the device, the
system simply sends the device its system ID.  The device then
accesses the system-unique parameters and operates accordingly.  As
an example, the procedure below...