Browse Prior Art Database

Local Area Network-Based Shared Memory Procedure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114897D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 73K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jensen, B: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Disclosed is a procedure by which applications running in a series of Local Area Network (LAN) machines can communicate through a shared memory segment. The name of this procedure is the LAN-Based Shared Memory Procedure (LBSMP).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Local Area Network-Based Shared Memory Procedure

      Disclosed is a procedure by which applications running in a
series of Local Area Network (LAN) machines can communicate through a
shared memory segment.  The name of this procedure is the LAN-Based
Shared Memory Procedure (LBSMP).

      Shared memory is a way for applications to quickly and
efficiently communicate.  In order to expand this support across
physical machines, LBSMP provides a procedure with a background
daemon process known as the Global Memory Manager (GMM).  This
process is responsible for receiving and processing requests, from
other GMM processes on remote machines, which include allocate
segment, update segment, read segment, and free segment.  GMM
provides this resource to application programs through an Application
Program Interface (API).

      When the GMM process is called by an application to allocate a
global memory segment, it is passed the name for the segment, the
segment size to allocate, and the names of the other machines on
which the segment is to be created.  The segment is created on the
local machine and then a request is sent to the GMM process on each
machine named by the caller.  The format of this request follows:

      When the request is received by the remote machines, each
remote GMM process receives the request, issues the create shared
memory request using the data passed in the request, and stores the
handle for the shared memory segment and the names from the Machine
Name List field into a Global Memory Directory (GMD) table.  This
table correlates the global memory segment name with its handle and
indicates the names of the remote machines on which this segment also
resides.  Once created, GMM responds to the requester with a good
return...