Browse Prior Art Database

Automated Surfacing of Related Data Elements

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114973D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 86K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Weber, OW: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a system which automatically surfaces related data elements to the user, based upon the relationship of the elements. This is accomplished through execution of a function which automatically opens, positions, and adjusts the data elements for the most convenient views on the desktop.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Automated Surfacing of Related Data Elements

      Disclosed is a system which automatically surfaces related data
elements to the user, based upon the relationship of the elements.
This is accomplished through execution of a function which
automatically opens, positions, and adjusts the data elements for the
most convenient views on the desktop.

      To illustrate, consider a software application which requires
complex configuration, such as address book synchronization.  Such
products enable the administrator to synchronize data among the
various address books of numerous software products (agents).  In
order to configure the system for synchronization, the administrator
must first identify and configure the relevant directories for each
agent, then define a mapping which describes how the data is to be
mapped to, and from, that directory.

      For example, suppose the administrator needs to synchronize the
ccMail directory, CCDIR, with the VM Callup directory, CALLDIR.  The
administrator selects the CALLDIR directory and defines a mapping as
follows:
  o  Map the desired CALLDIR fields to predefined "master fields".
      For example:
     1.  Map the CALLDIR NAME field to the master field NAME.
     2.  Map the CALLDIR EMPNUM field to the master field EMPNUM.
     3.  Map the CALLDIR MGR field to the master field HOLDFIELD.
          (Because, as will be seen, ccMail doesn't happen to have a
          MGR field.)
  o  Close and validate this directory mapping.

Then the administrator selects the CCDIR directory and defines a
mapping as follows:
  o  Map the master fields to the desired ccMail fields.
      For example:
     1.  Map the master field NAME to the CCDIR field NAME.
     2.  Map the master field EMPNUM to the CCDIR field EMPNUM.
     3.  Map the master field HOLDFIELD to the CCDIR field CONTACT.
  o  Close and validate this directory mapping.

      After the first directory is mapped, all subsequent directory
mappings are highly dependent upon the first one, but there is no
convenient method for referring back to it.  With current methods,
when the administrator attempts to define a subsequent directory
mapping, the first one has, by necessity, already been closed and
validated.  The administrator usually must use one of the two manual
methods to ensure that this dire...