Browse Prior Art Database

Communications Port Based Audit Procedure

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114975D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 77K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, BJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a procedure by which a remote support organization can easily view the application data in a machine for debug purposes using the First Failure Support Technology* (FFST) in real-time mode. The name of this procedure is the Communication Port Based Audit Procedure (CPBAP).

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This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Communications Port Based Audit Procedure

      Disclosed is a procedure by which a remote support organization
can easily view the application data in a machine for debug purposes
using the First Failure Support Technology* (FFST) in real-time mode.
The name of this procedure is the Communication Port Based Audit
Procedure (CPBAP).

      FFST is a software serviceability tool which is called by
applications when an error is detected.  FFST provides a series of
software serviceability functions which an application can use to
collect diagnostic data for debug purposes.  FFST services are
accessed through a series of Application Program Interfaces (APIs)
with a set of flags to indicate which services (e.g., error logging,
message logging, data collection) are required by a calling
application.  In addition, FFST also provides an interface by which
applications can register with FFST to receive a copy of each type of
data generated by FFST services through a pipe.

      FFST can be very helpful in problem diagnosis for errors which
which applications are programmed to detect.  When an error occurs
for which the application is not designed to detect, often a hard
failure (e.g., TRAP) or a "hang" condition will occur.  In the case
of the "hang" condition, most often a user will either force the
application to terminate or re-boot the system if the application
will not terminate.  In both cases, valuable data is lost - data
which contains the cause of the failure.  To solve this problem,
CPBAP was invented.

      CPBAP has two components: a main task and a data receiver task.
The main task is activated by a dial-in session to the failing
machine from a service machine.  When started, it creates a thread
and starts the data receiver task which will receive data from FFST.
Next, it uses the FFST interfa...