Browse Prior Art Database

Immediate Address Retention for Internetwork Packet Exchange Transmission

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114988D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crane, MA: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

IBM*'s Multi-Protocol Transport Services* (MPTS) provides a method for accessing the native Netware** Internetwork Packet Exchange** / Sequenced Packet Exchange** protocols using the Berkley SOCKETS Application Programming Interface. Netware**'s IPX is the Netware networking protocol for datagrams and SPX is the Netware networking protocol for connection oriented data exchanges.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Immediate Address Retention for Internetwork Packet Exchange Transmission

      IBM*'s Multi-Protocol Transport Services* (MPTS) provides a
method for accessing the native Netware** Internetwork Packet
Exchange** / Sequenced Packet Exchange** protocols using the Berkley
SOCKETS Application Programming Interface.  Netware**'s IPX is the
Netware networking protocol for datagrams and SPX is the Netware
networking protocol for connection oriented data exchanges.

      This disclosure describes a method for caching the fields
required in an IPX datagram send acquired by the IPXGetLocalTarget
function.  Using this function can cause a severe performance problem
if the sending node has multiple Netware network connections.  MPTS
supports Netware IPX as a datagram transport provider, and a method
had to be derived in MPTS to reduce the performance problem since
none of the other transport providers have this problem.

      The IPXGetLocalTarget function is typically issued by an
application using IPX to acquire the information required to know the
next node to send data on the path to the target.  If the node has
multiple network interfaces using Netware, the IPXGetLocalTarget
function queries the adapters one by one, starting with the primary
adapter.  If there is no route to the target on one of the adapters,
it will take multiple seconds for this function to return.  Each
adapter is always queried, even if a route is already found.  So it
is clear that some mechanism for retaining the immediate address
information, or else datagram sends will be extremely slow for
certain configurations.

      This particular method was derived using IBM's MPTS Protocol
Manager for Netware.  MPTS exists in the OS/2* environment, so
Netware for OS/2 APIs were used to solve this problem.  The data
needed from the IPXGetLocalTarget function that had to be retained in
OS/2 is the immediate address (a 6 byte field that has the node
adapter
addre...