Browse Prior Art Database

Translucent Drag Icons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000114994D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bardon, D: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A method for allowing the user to see both the source and target objects during a direct manipulation operation is disclosed. This method maintains the shape, color, and pattern characteristics of both the source and target elements.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Translucent Drag Icons

      A method for allowing the user to see both the source and
target objects during a direct manipulation operation is disclosed.
This method maintains the shape, color, and pattern characteristics
of both the source and target elements.

      With the increased use of high resolution display technology in
graphical user interfaces, users are required to interact with
smaller graphical user interface elements.  During a direct
manipulation (Drag/Drop) operation, icons of the source objects
appear near the mouse pointer.  When the possible targets of the
operation are small, it is difficult for the user to determine the
correct target because the source icons either partially or
completely cover up the targets.

      Translucent icons are created by applying a "checkerboard"
(alternating pixel) pattern of "transparent" color to the icon.  As a
result, where the icon is dragged, both the image of the icon and the
image of the background target can be seen (translucency).  The drag
icon becomes "see-through" without loosing its color and patterns.
This allows the user to see the drop targets through the drag icons,
even if they are smaller.  As the translucent icons move across the
target, the user is able to see alternating pixels of the target and
can perceive a complete picture of the target.  It also allows the
drag icon to stay visible over any background, light or dark.

      Icons in OS/2* are composed of two bitmaps (Fig. 1).  One
bitmap contains the Background Mask (the AND mask).  This mask is an
image that defines the shape of the icon.  The other bitmap contains
t...