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Mandrel Grip for Cable Pulling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115007D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 70K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Corman, S: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

With Fiber Optics (FO) data link systems becoming widespread in the computer industry, testing and installation of the jacketed FO cable becomes important. The transmitting fiber is quite small in diameter being only the thickness of a human hair and mechanical stress can cause attenuation in the link or permanent damage if kinked. During qualification testing of these cables, an axial load of up to 22 pounds is applied to the termination connector by pulling on the attached cable jacket. Attempts to use a clamp arrangement to apply the force deformed the plastic and potentially degrades the delicate internal members. This tends to therefore be a destructive test procedure which renders the subject cable unusable for system applications.

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Mandrel Grip for Cable Pulling

      With Fiber Optics (FO) data link systems becoming widespread in
the computer industry, testing and installation of the jacketed FO
cable becomes important.  The transmitting fiber is quite small in
diameter being only the thickness of a human hair and mechanical
stress can cause attenuation in the link or permanent damage if
kinked.  During qualification testing of these cables, an axial load
of up to 22 pounds is applied to the termination connector by pulling
on the attached cable jacket.  Attempts to use a clamp arrangement to
apply the force deformed the plastic and potentially degrades the
delicate internal members.  This tends to therefore be a destructive
test procedure which renders the subject cable unusable for system
applications.  A special geometry has been devised into a novel clamp
to allow the force to be applied without pinching the cable jacket
and leaving no permanent degradation to the subject part.  This
design is not limited to fiber optic cables, but may be useful for
any cable of fragile construction.

      Devised is a mandrel grip which uses friction to prevent the
slipping of the cable jacket as force is applied axially to the
cable.  Details of this particular design are shown in the Figure.  A
solid block of plastic has been machined so that the force attached
to the eyebolt is applied to the grip block along the axis of the
fiber.  The cable is subjected to a controlled bend radius defined by
the particular application desired.  In...