Browse Prior Art Database

Facilitating the Exchange of Digital Audio Information

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115040D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 4 page(s) / 184K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

deCarmo, L: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a software mechanism to facilitate the exchange of digital audio information across multiple applications. This mechanism includes facilities to support the interchange of any type of compressed or uncompressed audio data, the automatic conversion of audio data to destination format, a capability to preview audio samples from the system clipboard, advanced memory features to facilitate data sharing, and an independence from file formats.

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Facilitating the Exchange of Digital Audio Information

      Disclosed is a software mechanism to facilitate the exchange of
digital audio information across multiple applications.  This
mechanism includes facilities to support the interchange of any type
of compressed or uncompressed audio data, the automatic conversion of
audio data to destination format, a capability to preview audio
samples from the system clipboard, advanced memory features to
facilitate data sharing, and an independence from file formats.

      The rapid increase in the number of digital audio workstations
has enabled many personal computer users to create a large number of
audio files.  For instance, audio data can be incorporated into
electronic mail programs, placed into word processors, and attached
to spreadsheet cells.  Because these files are huge, a wide variety
of compression techniques have arisen, such as the IBM ADPCM
(Adaptive Pulse Code Modulation) and IMA (International Multimedia
Association) ADPCM compression techniques.  Since many of these
compression techniques are proprietary or not native to a particular
computer system, the compressed or uncompressed digital audio data
cannot be placed into the operating system clipboard or otherwise
exchanged with other applications.

      The Apple Macintosh* and NeXTStep** operating systems provide
system Application Programming Interfaces (API's) to insert and
retrieve digital audio information to or from the clipboard.  In
addition, Microsoft has published the file format required to insert
digital audio data into the Windows clipboard.  Since these
approaches support only a limited number of types of digital audio
compression, they use a great deal of file space.  Furthermore, there
is no automatic conversion of the destination compression type to
allow the seamless exchange of digital audio data.  Since these
approaches are file based, they conflict with many digital audio
applications which are memory-based, and they are tied closely to a
file format.

      Digital audio applications on various systems have been forced
to use simple, uncompressed PCM digital audio files, since there has
been no consistent operating system interface to place compressed, or
unique digital waveform files into the operating system clipboard.
Furthermore, the usefulness of existing clipboard API's has been
marginal, since all current API's force application developers to use
files.  Because many of the audio applications are memory based, this
requirement reduces the performance of the applications, while
forcing the application writer to create additional routines.

      Fig. 1 is a schematic overview of a digital audio data
interchange architecture, showing particularly a situation in which
an application requests that ADPCM data from a digital audio
waveform file (.wav) file be placed into the clipboard.  The problems
described above are overcome by coordinating the interchange of
digital a...