Browse Prior Art Database

Aircraft Deck Handling

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115118D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coles, RD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Aircraft such as helicopters are conventionally handled in the confined areas available on ship landing platforms by a shuttle mechanism. A typical arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 where a helicopter represented by center line 1 is to be maneuvered into a hangar 2 by a shuttle 3 which is traversed along a track 4 generally parallel to the fore/aft centerline of the ship. The nosewheel 5 of the helicopter has been turned to permit the aircraft to be moved under power to a point where the nosewheel can be captured by the shuttle. This is not only a difficult maneuver for the pilot, but the running of the rotors presents a substantial hazard to deck personnel.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 77% of the total text.

Aircraft Deck Handling

      Aircraft such as helicopters are conventionally handled in the
confined areas available on ship landing platforms by a shuttle
mechanism.  A typical arrangement is shown in Fig. 1 where a
helicopter represented by center line 1 is to be maneuvered into a
hangar 2 by a shuttle 3 which is traversed along a track 4 generally
parallel to the fore/aft centerline of the ship.  The nosewheel 5 of
the helicopter has been turned to permit the aircraft to be moved
under power to a point where the nosewheel can be captured by the
shuttle.  This is not only a difficult maneuver for the pilot, but
the
running of the rotors presents a substantial hazard to deck
personnel.

      An improved arrangement is shown in Fig. 2.  Attached to the
shuttle 3 is a hinged extension arm 6 carrying a nosewheel capture
head 7 supporting two capture arms 8, 9, which are latched open by a
release latch 10 against a spring normally urging them together.  The
extension arm 6 is itself spring loaded towards the center line.

      To maneuver the aircraft, the shuttle operator guides the
shuttle and the extension arm to a point where the aircraft's
nosewheel engages the release latch 10, causing the arms to close
around the nosewheel.  The pilot lines up the nosewheel with the
extension arm and the operator starts the towing processing.   The
arm 6 is rotated by its spring loading to the center line, at which
point the operator locks the arm and completes the...