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Definition of Vendor Specific Device Driver Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115126D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 91K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Broussard, S: AUTHOR [+6]

Abstract

Disclosed is a description of an application level vendor-specific driver interface that combines the primitive command sets of several diverse types of multimedia devices into a single unified driver interface. This device driver interface allows a robost multimedia system to encorporate the capabilities of multimedia device of any type into a consistent and device-independent and operating system independent programming interface.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 52% of the total text.

Definition of Vendor Specific Device Driver Interface

      Disclosed is a description of an application level
vendor-specific driver interface that combines the primitive command
sets of several diverse types of multimedia devices into a single
unified driver interface.  This device driver interface allows a
robost multimedia system to encorporate the capabilities of
multimedia
device of any type into a consistent and device-independent and
operating
system independent programming interface.

      Multimedia devices typically have functions that encompass
audio, video, data transport and device configuration.  These
functions
require a low-level API set which can keep pace with demanding data
control and transport requirements.  In previous systems, each device
type has its own interface, making it difficult to incorporate new,
compound devices into the system and enhance level of integration.
Therefore, a standardized VSD (Vendor Specific Driver) is required to
more easily integrate new hardware support into the system.

      This document defines a generic device driver-like interface at
application level which effectively decomposes the high-level MCD
(Media Control Driver) functions into more fundamental operations,
not just merely pass the high-level tasks down to the VSD.  Passing
high-level tasks down to the VSD allows device specific actions, but
it requires it to deal with the high-level problem not just
fundamental (primative) operations, therefore the VSD would be
required to be relatively complex.

      The VSD layer is a device-independent physical device
driver-like layer that resides in Ring 3 (see the OS/2* architecure).
It is a glue layer between the MCI system and (in theory) any
multimedia device.  It has the following characteristics:
  1.  Does not deal with Media Control Driver notifications.  Event
       procedures event procedures will be used.
  2.  Usually uses a single standard time format (MMTIME).
  3.  Does not do file management.
  4.  Does not deal with ring 3 streaming mechanisms.
  5.  Design is independent of the rest of the multimedia programming
       environment.
  6.  Design is operating system independent.

      Note that there are no known equivalent architectures that
provide a comprehensive multimedia device solution that is portable
across other architectures.

      The VSD expects that there will be multiple components in the
system sharing the interface to talk to a piece of hardware.

      An exampl...