Browse Prior Art Database

Fatal Error Notification to User

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000115270D
Original Publication Date: 1995-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-30
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kobayashi, K: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is methodology to notify a fatal error of the Hard Disk Drive (HDD) to an end user, not passing through the Host Personal Computer (PC).

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 86% of the total text.

Fatal Error Notification to User

      Disclosed is methodology to notify a fatal error of the Hard
Disk Drive (HDD) to an end user, not passing through the Host
Personal
Computer (PC).

      The HDD which supports the Write Cache function returns command
complete for the write command to the Host PC, just after whole data
is transferred to the buffer in the HDD from the Host PC, even if
that
data is not completely written into the disk medium.  By this
function,
the command execution time for the write command can be reduced.

      However, the HDD can never report the write error to the Host
PC, if data in the buffer can not be written into the disk medium for
some reason or other, after it returns command complete.  For such
condition, the HDD, which supports the write cache function, normally
supports the auto reassign function.  By this function, the data,
which could not be written into the original target sector, is
written into the alternative sector, and that alternative sector is
used in place of the original sector after next access.

      But in the worst condition, data in the buffer might not so
much as be written into the alternative sector.  In such case that
data will be lost in result, and an end user can not know such
condition, because the Host PC can not receive the write error.

      This disclosure provides an economical method to notify such a
fatal error condition to an end user.  When the HDD falls into such a
fatal err...